Sky Pilots

Endurance Navigators

A Crash Course
Open Orienteering Mapper

As part of our mapping tutorial, we've put together this Crash Course on Open Orienteering Mapper, the main software we're using.

A Crash Course
File Setup

          ⮝

So far, so good. We’ve now got a blank area for drawing the map, and a palette full of cool symbols (toggle the Symbol Window on or off with CTRL-Shift-8).

A Crash Course
Setting a Point Feature

          ⮝

A Crash Course
Getting Around

          ⮝

A Crash Course
Useful Information

          ⮝

As you hover over the map-drawing area, note some handy things that appear on the Status bar at the bottom of the display

A Crash Course
Manipulating Point Features

          ⮝

A Crash Course
Selecting Multiple Objects

          ⮝

A Crash Course
Rotating an Object

          ⮝

A Crash Course
Setting a Linear Feature

          ⮝

A Crash Course
Manipulating a Selected Linear Feature

          ⮝

A Crash Course
Bezier Curves

          ⮝

Scaling

Select a linear feature, hit the z key, Drag to scale it (enlarge or reduce), then Click the Edit objects tool to exit scaling mode.

A Crash Course
Color Priority

          ⮝

Draw two intersecting lines with 502 Wide road and zoom in a bit. So cool! How does the system know that the intersection shouldn’t have any thin black lines inside of it?

Well, it doesn’t. Those black lines are still present—they’re just not apparent. The brown infill color has a higher priority than the black border color, so the former occludes the latter wherever they both occur.

Color priority is responsible for a ton of very subtle behavior that is intended to make your life easier and provide power and flexibility when drawing. However, there are times when the way things act can be a bit confusing.

It’s sort of an advanced topic, but in those situations, you might get some insight by viewing the color priority scheme with CTRL-Shift-7 . Go ahead and look, but I’d recommend against changing anything. The priority scheme has many dependencies and any changes are very likely to have a number of unintended consequences.

A Crash Course
Setting an Area

          ⮝

Areas work a lot like lines. Anything you can do to a closed linear object, you can also do to an area. Practice making and manipulating some areas such as 301 Uncrossable body of water , 401 Open land , and 410 Vegetation: fight .

You can also switch an area feature to a closed linear feature and vice versa. For example, if an area enclosed by a fence is to be shown as 520 Area that shall not be entered , you can clone the fence (d key) and then switch the clone (CTRL-G) to the out-of-bounds symbol.

Finally, there are some special operations that mainly pertain to overlapping areas. Draw two overlapping areas using the same symbol, then Click the Unify areas tool .

Now draw two overlapping areas using two different symbols (for instance 403 Rough open land and 408 Vegetation: walk ). According to the color priority scheme, the green area occludes the yellow area. But what if we want to use the yellow area to eat away at (remove part of) the green area? Select the two areas in this specific order: the area that you want to chew a hole in, and then the area that you want to seem to grow by virtue of being unveiled. Then Click the Cut away from area tool .

A Crash Course
Complete

          ⮝

That’s it for the crash course! Decide whether you want to Save your file or throw it out. For our actual project, we’ll create a new file.

What's Next

Put your skills to use and start mapping!

⮝ Back to Top ⮝